Skip to main content

Book Review: Wars of the Roses: Bloodline by Conn Iggulden

Today, I'm excited to welcome back my good friend Kelly Gropp, founder/blogger/editor of Chubs Lived Here lifestyle blog. Kelly is here to review Wars of the Roses: Bloodline by Conn Iggulden.

About the reviewer: Kelly has nearly done it all yet is still plugging away at her bucket list with style! Kelly is an imperfect DIYer who refuses to hang up her tool belt, and is a struggling runner who has committed to finishing a 5K in every state. She is your neighbor, your co-worker, and your best friend. Her career as a legal secretary at one of the country’s top international law firms doesn’t keep her from reading and writing for enjoyment, decorating and redecorating, advocating for pit bull type dogs, and sharing the mishmash we call life. Oh, she is a cancer survivor too! You’ll be entertained as you follow Kelly’s journey at Chubs Lived Here.


War of the Roses: Bloodline book cover
Review of Wars of the Roses: Bloodline by Conn Iggulden
By Kelly Gropp

A king is being held in the tower, another claims the throne, and a trusted life-long family confidant feels forsaken. Set amidst the bloodiest battle fought on English soil--the Battle of Towton, Conn Iggulden's novel, Wars of the Roses: Bloodline, graphically captures not only the barbarous battle that claimed 28,000 lives, but also the contrast of honor versus indignity, trust versus betrayal, and love versus hate.

I jumped into this series with book #3, Bloodline, and was worried I would be lost. It took a few chapters to get the characters sorted, and then I truly enjoyed this book. I am a fan of historical fiction, and Bloodline was excellent.

The question of any character being fictional never crossed my mind because each was written extraordinarily well. Iggulden also painted the landscape and lifestyle so that I felt I was watching a movie in my mind. He skillfully conveyed the harshness and brutality of the time.

I felt a strong sense of what motivated the protagonists, why they felt threatened, and what was at stake for each. This narrative of the Lancasters, Yorks and Nevilles is fascinating, not only because of its historical value, but also because this is a page turner. This has become one of my favorite historical fiction pieces, and I can't wait to read books #1 and #2!

About the author
Conn Iggulden is the author of two previous series on Julius Caesar and on the Mongol Khans of Central Asia and also the co-author of The Dangerous Book for Boys. Conn lives in Hertfordshire with his wife and children.

From the author's website: I was born in the normal way in 1971, and vaguely remember half-pennies and sixpences. I have written for as long as I can remember: poetry, short stories and novels. It’s what I always wanted to do and read English at London University with writing in mind. I taught English for seven years and was Head of English at St. Gregory’s RC High School in London by the end of that period. I have enormous respect for those who still labour at the chalk-face. In truth, I can’t find it in me to miss the grind of paperwork and initiatives. I do miss the camaraderie of the smokers’ room, as well as the lessons where their faces lit up as they understood what I was wittering on about.

This review was written based on a copy of Wars of the Roses: Bloodline that I received from the publisher in exchange for an honest review. This post includes Amazon Affiliate links. If you purchase something using my link, I will receive a very small commission but your price does not change. 

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

Getting back to blogging

It seems that blogging has dropped to the bottom of my list for the past year, and was pretty low for the year or two prior to that. I love to read, and am continuing to do so, but as my regular readers know I haven't been around much. My last blog post was almost a year ago!!

There are many things that have taken me away from blogging. Work has been much more challenging and interesting these past few years, but that means I really don't want to get back on the computer when I get home at night - or on the weekends.

Family life has been more busy with kids having multiple activities in the evenings, leaving little time to just hang out and write about the books that I read.

I will admit to a bit of a Facebook addiction, which means way too much time spent scrolling through my newsfeed instead of doing something more productive. This is one of the things I'm working on and hoping that this will free up some time for getting back to the blog.

Overall, life is good. Work is …

Banned Books Week: Junie B. Jones by Barbara Park

This is the end of Banned Books Week and unfortunately, I haven't had a lot of time to write about banned books this year. But I did want to include at least one post about it, so today I wanted to share one of the book series that it seems most people are surprised to find on the list: Junie B. Jones by Barbara Park.

According to Wikipedia:
The Junie B. Jones series came in at #71 on the American Library Association's list of the Top 100 Banned or Challenged Books from 2000-2009. Reasons cited are poor social values taught by the books and Junie B. Jones not being considered a good role model due to her mouthiness and bad spelling/grammar. This is an interesting example of a banned book. Many times there are serious, controversial topics featured in books that are challenged. Things like homosexuality, drugs, vulgar language, etc. You can actually understand why people may not want their children to read those books, and why they may challenge their inclusion in school libra…

April Reading Review

Where exactly did April go? I swear it was just the middle of March and now it's May. Once again, I'm going to provide a quick review of each of the books I read last month. For the last two weeks of the month, I participated in the Spring Into Horror Readathon hosted by Michelle at Seasons of Reading. The only rule was that you had to read at least one book that was horror, thriller, etc. I read one book that qualified. With the exception of the first book in my list, the books I mention below were read during the readathon


My book club's May selection was Just Mercy by Bryan Stevenson. I had started reading this nonfiction book about the author's work representing men, women and children who were on death row in March but finished the book in April. This is an eye-opening story that everyone at my book club discussion agreed should be required reading for law schools and police officers and even legislators who are making the laws related to judgements. I learned to…