Wednesday, June 1, 2011

Book Review: A Game of Character by Craig Robinson


Craig Robinson went from living in the projects of Chicago, to graduating from Princeton University, to vice president at Morgan Stanley Dean Witter, to coaching Ivy League and Division 1 basketball teams. Along the way, he used the lessons and values instilled in him by his parents, Fraser and Marian Robinson, to work hard, be relentless and persevere.

In A Game of Character, Robinson shares many stories from his youth, including numerous examples of how his parents taught he and his sister, Michelle Robinson Obama, important character traits. He also shows many ways in which the game of basketball can build and expose a person's character. Does a player know when to pass the ball or does he always take the shot himself? Can a player take a risk when an opportunity presents itself, or does he always do the "right," safe move? Although I'm not a fan of basketball, it was an interesting way to examine a person's character.

In addition to his youth, Robinson also shares how he made it to, and through, Princeton University. And why he made choices later in his life that were grounded in those early lessons learned from his parents and his coaches. A Game of Character is an inspirational tale that gave me many ideas as a parent on how to instill the importance of hard work and determination into my children. I think the book has a lot to offer parents, basketball fans and players, and of course, those who want to get a glimpse into the First Lady's childhood as well. After all, Michelle Obama grew up in the same household as Robinson, and many of his early stories feature his sister as well.

My Rating: 3.5/5

This review was written based on a copy of A Game of Character that I received from TLC Book Tours in exchange for an honest review.

Click here to check out the other stops on this TLC Book Tour

1 comment:

Thanks for stopping by! I'd love to hear your thoughts!